Cochlear Rest

If you sit still long enough and stop the tapping on your keyboard, you can hear a tiny world around you pushing up against your cochlea which sends signals to your brain for identification.  Directly from the Wiki hyperlinked above: “The cochlea receives sound in the form of vibrations, which cause the stereocilia to move. The stereocilia then convert these vibrations into nerve impulses which are taken up to the brain to be interpreted.”

Now think about that for a minute.  What are you doing to your cochlea right now as you read this?  Are you stimulating it with the quiet of whatever sounds are around you in their most quiet form?  Is your ear canal jammed up with little speaker buds blasting some type of music into your ear to negate the loud din of your commute? Or is it absolutely silent where you are?  No sound at all…

If you answered the latter, then you are far away somewhere on a trip all of us should be on.  Silence is something of a spa day for our cochlea and it would be a lovely and restorative trip to help your two cochleas (yes, you have two ears, right?) take a vacay together and travel AWAY from all sound.  Even if your brain is busy buzzing away as mine is most day and night, it gets a rest when your cochlea isn’t trying to send NEW information in for interpretation.  When the mind can just think on its own rather than run the duality of thinking and pondering while also interpreting, you are giving it a much needed break.  For those with children, I hear you laughing now.  “Right, take a break from the noise!” But teach your children this and you’ll be raising little Buddhas rather than little “Ruddhas”.  (Loud people take up a LOT of everyone’s space.)

Won’t you give your cochleas a rest sometime today?

 

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